Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?
ISBN: 0345404475
EAN13: 9780345404473
Language: English
Pages: 256
Dimensions: 1.00" H x 8.00" L x 5.00" W
Format: Paperback
Publisher: Del Rey Books
Book Overview
A masterpiece ahead of its time, a prescient rendering of a dark future, and the inspiration for the blockbuster film Blade Runner By 2021, the World War has killed millions, driving entire species into extinction and sending mankind off-planet. Those who remain covet any living creature, and for people who can't afford one, companies built incredibly realistic simulacra: horses, birds, cats, sheep. They've even built humans. Immigrants to Mars receive androids so sophisticated they are indistinguishable from true men or women. Fearful of the havoc these artificial humans can wreak, the government bans them from Earth. Driven into hiding, unauthorized androids live among human beings, undetected. Rick Deckard, an officially sanctioned bounty hunter, is commissioned to find rogue androids and retire them. But when cornered, androids fight back--with lethal force. Praise for Philip K. Dick The most consistently brilliant science fiction writer in the world. --John Brunner A kind of pulp-fiction Kafka, a prophet. -- The New York Times Philip K. Dick] sees all the sparkling--and terrifying--possibilities . . . that other authors shy away from. -- Rolling Stone
Editor Reviews
From the front Cover The most consistently brilliant science fiction writer in the world. --John Brunner THE INSPIRATION FOR BLADERUNNER. . . Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? was published in 1968. Grim and foreboding, even today it is a masterpiece ahead of its time. By 2021, the World War had killed millions, driving entire species into extinction and sending mankind off-planet. Those who remained coveted any living creature, and for people who couldn't afford one, companies built incredibly realistic simulacrae: horses, birds, cats, sheep. . . They even built humans. Emigrees to Mars received androids so sophisticated it was impossible to tell them from true men or women. Fearful of the havoc these artificial humans could wreak, the government banned them from Earth. But when androids didn't want to be identified, they just blended in. Rick Deckard was an officially sanctioned bounty hunter whose job was to find rogue androids, and to retire them. But cornered, androids tended to fight back, with deadly results. [Dick] sees all the sparkling and terrifying possibilities. . . that other authors shy away from. --Paul Williams Rolling Stone