Learning to Improve: How America's Schools Can Get Better at Getting Better
ISBN: 1612507913
EAN13: 9781612507910
Language: English
Pages: 280
Dimensions: 1.00" H x 9.00" L x 6.00" W
Weight: 1.00 lbs.
Format: Paperback
Book Overview
Using ideas borrowed from improvement science, Learning to Improve shows how a process of disciplined inquiry can be combined with the use of networks to identify, adapt, and successfully scale up promising interventions in education.
Editor Reviews
From the Back Cover Using ideas borrowed from improvement science, Learning to Improve shows how a process of disciplined inquiry can be combined with the use of networks to identify, adapt, and successfully scale up promising interventions in education. Rather than implementing fast and learning slow, the authors believe educators should adopt a more rigorous approach to improvement that allows the field to learn fast to implement well. The authors focus on six principles that represent the foundational elements for improvement science carried out in networked communities: Make the work problem-specific and user-centered Focus on variation in performance See the system that produces the current outcomes We cannot improve at scale what we cannot measure Use disciplined inquiry to drive improvement Accelerate learning through networked communities Learning to Improve offers a new paradigm for research and development in education that promises to be a powerful driver of improvement for the nation's schools and colleges. In this hopeful and accessible volume, Bryk and his colleagues describe six tenets for addressing vexing problems of educational practice. Yes, systematic actions guided by serious scientific inquiry can lead to improvements in a vast array of contexts, topics, and settings. Drawing on numerous real life examples and illustrations, the authors demonstrate how to develop and then critically execute good ideas to produce reliably positive outcomes. -- John Q. Easton, distinguished senior fellow, Spencer Foundation Anthony S. Bryk is the president of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. Louis M. Gomez holds the MacArthur Chair in Digital Media and Learning in the Graduate School of Education & Information Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles, and is a senior partner at Carnegie. Alicia Grunow is a senior partner and co-director of the Center for Networked Improvement at Carnegie. Paul G. LeMahieu is the senior vice president for programs at Carnegie and the former superintendent of education for the state of Hawaii.
From the front Cover Using ideas borrowed from improvement science, Learning to Improve shows how a process of disciplined inquiry can be combined with the use of networks to identify, adapt, and successfully scale up promising interventions in education. Rather than implementing fast and learning slow, the authors believe educators should adopt a more rigorous approach to improvement that allows the field to learn fast to implement well. The authors focus on six principles that represent the foundational elements for improvement science carried out in networked communities: Make the work problem-specific and user-centered Focus on variation in performance See the system that produces the current outcomes We cannot improve at scale what we cannot measure Use disciplined inquiry to drive improvement Accelerate learning through networked communities Learning to Improve offers a new paradigm for research and development in education that promises to be a powerful driver of improvement for the nation's schools and colleges. In this hopeful and accessible volume, Bryk and his colleagues describe six tenets for addressing vexing problems of educational practice. Yes, systematic actions guided by serious scientific inquiry can lead to improvements in a vast array of contexts, topics, and settings. Drawing on numerous real life examples and illustrations, the authors demonstrate how to develop and then critically execute good ideas to produce reliably positive outcomes. -- John Q. Easton, distinguished senior fellow, Spencer Foundation Anthony S. Bryk is the president of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. Louis M. Gomez holds the MacArthur Chair in Digital Media and Learning in the Graduate School of Education & Information Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles, and is a senior partner at Carnegie. Alicia Grunow is a senior partner and co-director of the Center for Networked Improvement at Carnegie. Paul G. LeMahieu is the senior vice president for programs at Carnegie and the former superintendent of education for the state of Hawaii.