Media and Revolution
ISBN: 0813118999
EAN13: 9780813118994
Language: English
Pages: 256
Dimensions: 1.00" H x 10.00" L x 6.00" W
Weight: 1.00 lbs.
Format: Hardcover
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Book Overview
As television screens across America showed Chinese students blocking government tanks in Tiananmen Square, the fall of the Berlin Wall, and missiles searching their targets in Baghdad, the connection between media and revolution seemed more significant than ever. In this book, thirteen prominent scholars examine the role of the communication media in revolutionary crises -- from the Puritan Revolution of the 1640s to the upheaval in the former Czechoslovakia. Their central question: Do the media in fact have a real influence on the unfolding of revolutionary crises? On this question, the contributors diverge, some arguing that the press does not bring about revolution but is part of the revolutionary process, others downplaying the role of the media. Essays focus on areas as diverse as pamphlet literature, newspapers, political cartoons, and the modern electronic media. The authors' wide-ranging views form a balanced and perceptive examination of the impact of the media on the making of history.
Editor Reviews
From the Back Cover As television screens across America showed Chinese students blocking their government's tanks in Tiananmen Square, or the fall of the Berlin Wall, or those first missiles of the Gulf War searching their targets in Bagdad, the connection between media and revolution seemed more significant than ever. In this book, thirteen prominent scholars examine the role of the communication media in revolutionary crises - from the Puritan Revolution of the 1640s to the upheaval in former Czechoslovakia that remains unresolved today. Their central question: Do the media in fact have a real influence on the unfolding of revolutionary crises? On this question, the contributors diverge. In his examination of the power of the newspaper in the French Revolution, Pierre Retat argues that the press does not bring about the revolution but is a part of the revolutionary process. Popkin shares Retat's conviction that changes in media praxis are essential symbols of the nature of revolutionary upheaval. Jeffrey Wasserstrom, taking the opposite view, argues that the extensive attention paid to the effects of worldwide television coverage of the demonstrations in Tiananmen Square masks the fact that the Chinese students were essentially reworking protest rituals rooted in their country's history and culture long before the modern media era. Owen Johnson, in his essay on the Czechoslovak press during the Velvet Revolution, likewise downplays the role of the media. The remaining contributors - Jeffrey Brooks, Jack R. Censer, Tim Harris, Thomas C. Leonard, Stephen R. Mackinnon, Michael Mendle, Jeffery A. Smith, Jonathan Sperber, Mark W. Summers - focus on pamphlet literature, newspapers, political cartoons, andthe modern electronic media. Together, their wide-ranging views form a balanced and perceptive examination of the impact of the media on the making of history.