The Fiery Trial: Abraham Lincoln and American Slavery
ISBN: 039334066X
EAN13: 9780393340662
Language: English
Publication Date: September 26, 2011
Pages: 448
Dimensions: 1.10" H x 8.27" L x 5.59" W
Weight: 0.86 lbs.
Format: Paperback
Book Overview
From a master historian comes the story of Lincoln's--and the nation's--transformation through the crucible of slavery and emancipation.
Editor Reviews
From the Back Cover ADVANCE PRAISE FOR THE FIERY TRIAL: While many thousands of books deal with Lincoln and slavery, Eric Foner has written the definitive account of this crucial subject, illuminating in a highly original and profound way the interactions of race, slavery, public opinion, politics, and Lincoln's own character that led to the wholly improbable uncompensated emancipation of some four million slaves. Even seasoned historians will acquire fresh and new perspectives from reading The Fiery Trial. --David Brion Davis, Sterling Professor of History Emeritus, Yale University, author of Inhuman Bondage: The Rise and Fall of Slavery in the New World Definitive and breathtaking: with dazzling clarity and authority, demonstrating a total command of his sources and a sense of moral justice that transcends history, Foner has done nothing less than provide the most persuasive book ever written on Lincoln's vital place in the fight for freedom in America. This volume stands alone in the field. It is not only the best account ever written on the subject; henceforth, it should be regarded as the only account. --Harold Holzer, author of Lincoln President-Elect Eric Foner has done it again. The Fiery Trial explores the pivotal subject of Lincoln and slavery free from the mists of hagiography and the muck of denigration. With his usual stylish mastery, Foner advances enlightened debate over our greatest president, the origins and unfolding of the Civil War, and the abolition of southern slavery. His book marks an auspicious intellectual beginning to the sesquicentennial of the American Iliad. --Sean Wilentz, author of The Rise of American Democracy: Jefferson to Lincoln