A History Of The World In 6 Glasses
  • A History Of The World In 6 Glasses
  • A History Of The World In 6 Glasses
  • A History Of The World In 6 Glasses
  • A History Of The World In 6 Glasses
ISBN: 0802715524
EAN13: 9780802715524
Language: English
Release Date: Apr 1, 2006
Pages: 336
Dimensions: 1.1" H x 8.2" L x 5.5" W
Weight: 0.65 lbs.
Format: Paperback
`
Select Format Format: Paperback Select Conditions Condition: Good

Selected

Format: Paperback

Condition: Good

$4.08
List Price: $18
Save: $13.92 (77%)
Quantity
59 Available
Add 4 More to Qualify
Buy 3, Get 1 Free
All Books Under $5

Select Conditions
  • Good $4.08 A History Of The World In 6 Glasses
  • Like New $4.88 A History Of The World In 6 Glasses
  • Acceptable $4.08 A History Of The World In 6 Glasses
  • New $18.00 A History Of The World In 6 Glasses
Book Overview

This Description may be from another edition of this product.

Throughout human history, certain drinks have done much more than just quench thirst. As Tom Standage relates with authority and charm, six of them have had a surprisingly pervasive influence on the course of history, becoming the defining drink during a pivotal historical period. A History of the World in 6 Glasses tells the story of humanity from the Stone Age to the twenty-first century through the lens of beer, wine, spirits, coffee, tea, and cola. Beer was first made in the Fertile Crescent and by 3000 B.C.E. was so important to Mesopotamia and Egypt that it was used to pay wages. In ancient Greece, wine became the main export of her vast seaborne trade, helping spread Greek culture abroad. Spirits such as brandy and rum fueled the Age of Exploration, fortifying seamen on long voyages and oiling the pernicious slave trade. Although coffee originated in the Arab world, it stoked revolutionary thought in Europe during the Age of Reason, when coffeehouses became centers of intellectual exchange. And hundreds of years after the Chinese began drinking tea, it became especially popular in Britain, with far-reaching effects on British foreign policy. Finally, though carbonated drinks were invented in 18th-century Europe, they became a 20th-century phenomenon, and Coca-Cola in particular is the leading Read More chevron_right

Frequently Asked Questions About A History Of The World In 6 Glasses

Book Reviews (6)

5
  |   6  reviews
Did you read A History Of The World In 6 Glasses? Please provide your feedback and rating to help other readers.
Write Review
Captcha
5
   Goes down easy
I got this book just before I left for the airport. I kept reading it after I arrived at my destination. I' ve read a lot of books about food and drink, but this one is different because of how it integrates itself into a historical context. Maybe it's just that I didn't take enough history classes in high school, but this book made me very interested in knowing about the history of the Persian empire, the various revolutions and monarchies in France. Did I ever learn how to make a great drink? This is not a recipe book. The book spans the entire history of humankind from the dawn of civilization to the present day. The writing style is historicalscientific and also interesting. I will have to check it out next.
 
5
   Great book for foodies and history fans
This book reviews the history of the human race in relation to the beverages that have followed us, such as beer, wine, coffee, tea liquor and soft drinks. The beer section starts with the Fertile Crescent and Egypt. Wine deals with early Western history. Coffee has an evocative history of North Africa and Renaissance Europe. China, India and the British Empire are depicted in tea. Liquor deals with a number of topics, including the New World, the slave trade, and Rum and Whiskey. Coca Cola spread via World War 2 throughout the world, with soda deals in America. The book is very entertaining. It is recommended.
 
5
   Water, water everywhere...
I' ve known about water's role in building societies. I worked for a relief and development organization that provided clean water. The life of a community can be changed by a well. Safe water saves lives. Women and children don't have to walk for hours to fetch water which is likely to make them sick. Children can spend more time in school and women in businesses. The book shows how our ancestors created societies on water that was refined and distilled. boiling the water is important. A group of people went to a restaurant on the side of the road that was serving soup made from water. Too many people around the world do not have access to clean water.
 
3
   Didn't keep me in its grip
I like nonfiction, but this one dragged on for me. I had to read it for the book club but wouldn't have chosen it for my own entertainment. It's just me. I would have liked a magazine article on the six beverages, but not a book about them. I'm not a drinker so it doesn't help. The subject matter was not easy for me. Just not my cup of tea.
 
5
   AP World History Review
The clear story of humanity is shown in beverages. The drinks pertain to knowledge and the spread of new ideas. I am giving this book five stars because it captures everything that happened. This book makes reading it a lot better. The pace of the book makes it possible for students like me to understand it. The book does not include any social changes like the women's right or minority's rights. A history of the world in 6 glasses showed how different periods in history were. The change of civilizations is being shown to globalization. The improvement of urban areas and trade is depicted in this book. It shows the change in power in the hemispheres and the fall of empires.
 
5
   A very interesting book and well worth the read
4.5 out of 5 points. Standage's book on the history of food was enjoyable. The book was quite similar, but it seemed a tad less scholarly and more for a general audience. It's a tad less heavy. It was fascinating. Beer, wine, spirits, coffee, tea, and cola are some of the most important drinks. I learned a lot about ancient beer recipes and how the Greeks mixed their wine with water. The book is well worth a read for the food buff, history buff, and anyone who likes drinks.
 
1