Dispatches From Pluto: Lost And Found In The Mississippi Delta
  • Dispatches From Pluto: Lost And Found In The Mississippi Delta
  • Dispatches From Pluto: Lost And Found In The Mississippi Delta
  • Dispatches From Pluto: Lost And Found In The Mississippi Delta
ISBN: 1476709645
EAN13: 9781476709642
Language: English
Release Date: Oct 13, 2015
Pages: 320
Dimensions: 0.73" H x 8.43" L x 5.85" W
Weight: 0.79 lbs.
Format: Paperback

Dispatches From Pluto: Lost And Found In The Mississippi Delta

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Book Overview

In Dispatches from Pluto, adventure writer Richard Grant takes on the most American place on Earth--the enigmatic, beautiful, often derided Mississippi Delta.

Richard Grant and his girlfriend were living in a shoebox apartment in New York City when they decided on a whim to buy an old plantation house in the Mississippi Delta. Dispatches from Pluto--winner of the Pat Conroy Southern Book Prize--is their journey of discovery into this strange and wonderful American place. Imagine A Year In Provence with alligators and assassins, or Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil with hunting scenes and swamp-to-table dining.

On a remote, isolated strip of land, three miles beyond the tiny community of Pluto, Richard and his girlfriend, Mariah, embark on a new life. They learn to hunt, grow their own food, and fend off alligators, snakes, and varmints galore. They befriend an array of unforgettable local characters--blues legend T-Model Ford, cookbook maven Martha Foose, catfish farmers, eccentric millionaires, and the actor Morgan Freeman. Grant brings an adept, empathetic eye to the fascinating people he meets, capturing the rich, extraordinary culture of the Delta, while tracking its utterly bizarre and criminal extremes. Reporting from all angles as only an outsider can, Grant also delves deeply into the Delta's lingering racial tensions. Read More chevron_right

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Book Reviews (12)

5
  |   12  reviews
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5
   Delta. Blues
After years of oppression, the black people are often expected to shake it off and be grateful for their civil rights. At the same time, we see that racism is not just black towards white. But we see it manifested in black towards Mexican and White, the same as the Mexican and Whites. I believe that racism has been seen in most areas of our country, as different nationalities learn to live together. In order to gain respect and acceptance, one must take care of their own business. All this was told in a story of two people moving from NYC to the Delta and learning to live together in a foreign culture.
 
5
   Truth in Mississippi
Having grown up in the South, this book brought out many happy and sad memories of my own upbringing. Racial opinions make more common sense than anything out of Washington D.C.
 
5
   ... Louisiana but now live in California and I really enjoyed Richard Gran's perspective of living in the south
I grew up in southern Louisiana, but now live in California and I really enjoyed Richard Gran's perspective of living in the South, especially in regards to racism. It is always hard for me to describe the South in terms of poverty, education, incarceration, politics and how this is balanced by an incredibly polite, courteous and vibrant culture that is unlike anywhere else in America the way Richard has. Excited to read by him more books.
 
4
   An honest but warm description of life in the Mississippi Delta
The author's journey to try to understand the complications of race relations that are far too nuanced to be captured in a single simple word like Racism ''. Born and raised in the Delta, I believe that Richard Grant got it exactly right. Not just with facts, but also with the feel and taste of it.
 
3
   It's okay
And it seemed to me that it was all I, I'; I. Poor Mariah got a short shrift.
 
4
   Not like his others
I was not expecting this, but I like two subjects, so that I found the book enjoyable. His best book was the trip to Africa and the second best was the trip to Mexico.
 
5
   A look at the Delta
I highly recommend it for those of us who live in the south and for some northerners who don 't understand.
 
5
   You can’t go home again….is true.
What a fun book to read, though sad to know that life is so changed in Clarksdale. I was married for a few years to a man from Clarksdale, long enough to appreciate the pulse of the plantation owners and their “workers ”, not slaves. Those hard working black people were valued for the reasons the author came to know. Eccentrics ran in the Delta... my husband was with another man! So ya go! Anyway, this is wonderfully written and makes me want to read all his books and hope he writes more about the quirkyness of this great state of Mississippi. Around every corner, stories abound. My elder black-stained maid still lives on the coast and says we have lots to write about!
 
4
   Why would anyone do this?
I have no idea what possessed me to read this book... and I almost didn 't. Fighting these snakes and other various critters surrounded by mosquitoes, vermin, racists and poverty would never appeal to me in a million years. I read a few chapters and put it aside. Then I would wonder how he and Mariah were doing. And so I read a few more chapters. I rated the content as a 2. I rate his ability to draw you a solid 5 despite himself a fine 5.
 
5
   Oh, that explains why I found the Delta so interesting. It ain't just the Blues
I am fascinated by the Deep South and particularly the Delta, having driven through there as part of my personal Blues Highway trip sveral years back. I recommend that he travels on Highway 49 from Memphis to Baton Rouge. A drive through Clarksdale, with a stop at the Delta Blues Museum and the famous crossing is almost religious and highly recommended. But a historical trip is going to provide only a glimpse of this beautiful region. This book answers so many questions I have since, and provides a wonderful account of the area and the people who choose to live there. I need to get back there now and spend a little longer time, it's much different than I thought. One of the few non-fiction books I have read in such a short time. Richard Grant gets more books of Gotta.
 
12