How Not To Be Wrong: The Power Of Mathematical Thinking
ISBN: 0143127535
EAN13: 9780143127536
Language: English
Release Date: May 26, 2015
Pages: 480
Dimensions: 1.1" H x 8.1" L x 5.5" W
Weight: 0.85 lbs.
Format: Paperback
Publisher:
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Book Overview

The Freakonomics of math--a math-world superstar unveils the hidden beauty and logic of the world and puts its power in our hands

The math we learn in school can seem like a dull set of rules, laid down by the ancients and not to be questioned. In How Not to Be Wrong, Jordan Ellenberg shows us how terribly limiting this view is: Math isn't confined to abstract incidents that never occur in real life, but rather touches everything we do--the whole world is shot through with it.

Math allows us to see the hidden structures underneath the messy and chaotic surface of our world. It's a science of not being wrong, hammered out by centuries of hard work and argument. Armed with the tools of mathematics, we can see through to the true meaning of information we take for granted: How early should you get to the airport? What does public opinion really represent? Why do tall parents have shorter children? Who really won Florida in 2000? And how likely are you, really, to develop cancer?

How Not to Be Wrong presents the surprising revelations behind all of these questions and many more, using the mathematician's method of analyzing life and exposing the hard-won insights of the academic community to the layman--minus the jargon. Ellenberg chases mathematical threads through a vast range of time and space, from the everyday to the cosmic, Read More chevron_right

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Book Reviews (12)

4
  |   12  reviews
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5
   reading "How Not to be Wrong" will not disappoint. You may not loose weight
This book is a revelation, highly informative and well written. Given today's broad range of choices for self-improvement activities, even the most seasoned reader will find the book's format both useful and challenging. It is a treasure that should never be ignored. Quattrone said the client only needed a "few minutes to get everything done." But if you find yourself glancing through your college math texts again, you may find yourself in a math class again.
 
4
   Written in thoughtful and entertaining verbiage we can all understand ...
We can all understand his witty one-line quips, but he doesn't talk to his intended audience. This is a great read, and makes for an engaging read, too. While I was not steady in keeping with the material, I found that I could put it down and pick it up with ease and little loss of interest. Thanks for the support.
 
5
   Embrace this book and enjoy the enlightenment that you will receive once you have ...
Embrace this book and enjoy the enlightenment that you will receive once you have finished reading it.
 
4
   Nice Journey Through Mathematics
Overall, I enjoyed the book. It was not a tedious read like many other books on this subject. The story flowed nicely and the subject matter was compelling, Crowe said. I really enjoyed the section on regression because it gave me a good introduction to data analysis. If you are a political conservative, then I hope you have thick skin when you read this. The author appears to enjoy defending liberal positions defended by others, even if that means losing a few friends. If you can stomach his bias in this field, then this is an enjoyable read.
 
1
   disappointing
This book was a great introduction to the world of illusionist fiction, and an excellent companion to the "American Masters" series - a great introduction to the ridiculous, wrong-headed, and even hopeless minds of the uninformed or poorly informed person. From Aristotle's "theory of Everything" to Williams' "conspiracy theories," the book rambles across topics and cobbles mathematical or scientific principles to events in a way that seems to represent the political views of the author more than anything else.
 
5
   An Excellent Publication!
It's a great book, said Pauley, who has done extensive research on the Beatles. It's all about logic and commonsense, Raymond said. I took a math course at Boston College called Survey of Math. It was a lot of fun, said Blair. The fact is, I never knew that Dr. Shelby had done anything wrong.
 
1
   Very Disappointing
I stopped reading when the word Obamacare came up. Sorry, I didn't check the reviews before I ordered. They call it credit. The left is masters of propaganda.
 
5
   I dislike math but love mathematical thinking
I've never been particularly good at math, but I find that I enjoy abstract thinking, he said.
 
2
   The title should be "A brief History of Mathematics and Mathematicians"
The book is titled "The Blair Witch's Material World." I feel a little cheated by the title, Taylor said. This is one of the worst edited books I have read -- the author rambles on and on about tangential topics. This is sort of who said what and who did what book on mathematicians for the most part, Raymond said. Some snippets and especially the start were promising, he said. Could have given 3 stars if the movie's creators had not intentionally cheated people.
 
5
   Why math is worth knowing
Mathematicians say there's no such thing as a bad math problem. This book is a wonderful introduction to mathematical reason and how to use it to cope with the real world, Raymond said. It also sells T-shirts featuring nuggets for a semi-pro wrestler.
 
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