Kiplinger's Retire Worry-Free: Money-Smart Ways To Build The Nest Egg You'll Need
  • Kiplinger's Retire Worry-Free: Money-Smart Ways To Build The Nest Egg You'll Need
  • Kiplinger's Retire Worry-Free: Money-Smart Ways To Build The Nest Egg You'll Need
  • Kiplinger's Retire Worry-Free: Money-Smart Ways To Build The Nest Egg You'll Need
ISBN: 1623176050
EAN13: 9781623176051
Language: English
Release Date: Jan 18, 2022
Pages: 256
Weight: 1 lbs.
Format: Paperback
Select Format Format: Paperback Select Conditions Condition: New

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Format: Paperback

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Book Reviews (5)

4
  |   5  reviews
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1
   Misleading subtitle
Fine storytelling, but not for Indigenizing science. She has displayed a lack of interest in the science of her community. I'm curious how much actual work the author does with our community. The Harrisons’ lawyer Paul LiCalsi said: “We wouldn’t recommend this to aspiring scientists.
 
5
   How can you hate a book that the author poured their soul on?
But we all can give good reviewsbad reviews about a book. What we could've wanted to see, but honestly we dont take the time to even try to pour our soul out of their in written form. The author took that initiative to start the dialogue about a topic that in the western world seemed to be as stigmatising as peanut butter. Newer generations are losing the ways their ancestors did things, the book argues. He talks about struggles over the new way of thinking but also reminds us to take it back to indigenous roots. Can't wait to read the sequel!
 
5
   There is no conservation with Indigenous peoplw
This book is by far the best. It's very accessible in its language and clearly lays out why Indigenous people and their traditional knowledge and practices are essential to environmental stewardship, he said. Hernandez makes a strong case for why it is important that conservation projects and policies include local Indigenous peoples.
 
1
   More memoir than instructive
The author and a PhD student in environmental conservation speak frankly of the loss of indigenous land and culture through colonialism. But the book is mostly about her personal struggle and the pain suffered by Indigenous people who have endured the land being stolen. There is very little devoted to the illustrating or educating on how to heal the land using Indigenous Science. The book would be better served by a different title that signaled this book is a memoir and a call for attention to a cause versus an instruction and message of hope, Kirk said.
 
5
   More about activism than science
This book felt more like an activist manifesto than a science book. It's all right, but it wasn't exactly what I expected. In this book, I learned about many of the issues that are facing the Indigenous People of Central America. It's a big uphill climb, and I applaud the author for her passion, Garton said. My one wish is that she would have covered more about the actual science and techniques that the Indigenous people are using to change their landscapes, he said.
 
1