National Audubon Society Field Guide To North American Trees: Eastern Region
ISBN: 0394507606
EAN13: 9780394507606
Language: English
Release Date: May 12, 1980
Pages: 714
Dimensions: 1.1" H x 7.6" L x 3.8" W
Weight: 1.1 lbs.
Format: Vinyl-Bound

National Audubon Society Field Guide To North American Trees: Eastern Region

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Book Overview

Tree peepers everywhere will enjoy these two guides which explore the incredible environment of our country's forests-including seasonal features, habitat, range, and lore. Nearly 700 species of trees are detailed in photographs of leaf shape, bark, flowers, fruit, and fall leaves -- all can be quickly accessed making this the ideal field guide for any time of year.
Note: the Eastern Edition generally covers states east of the Rocky Mountains, while the Western Edition covers the Rocky Mountain range and all the states to the west of it.

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Book Reviews (11)

5
  |   11  reviews
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5
   Good reference for identification
Field work was done last year in forests within the eastern United States, so I decided to purchase this guide to help me with tree identification, as it is a necessary component of my job. My favorite part about this guide is the photographs of each species of tree, as well as the illustrations and descriptions that go with them. Here there is a wealth of images and information to find in such a compact book. I can go to this guide for reference and verification and it typically points me in the right direction. Every time I take it with me, I now go into the field.
 
5
   Extensive, crisp, and beautiful color photos
The National Audobon series of the identification books are always the best. Trees are identified by leaf and other properties making it easy to group your interest tree in a matter of seconds. At the bottom of each photo is a tree and a page number that takes you to relevant information about each species. This is the best tree identification book I have found and would highly recommend it to anyone interested in learning more about trees in the eastern half of the United States. One note is that the book is relatively heavy due to the extensive information, so that it may be better used in the home as a reference book, rather than a hiking guide.
 
4
   Great images
I bought this field guide for my outdoors - loving significant other. He uses it to burn trees in our indoor wood stove safely. He says that all the detailed images are incredibility helpful and the leather cover makes it looks really nice.
 
5
   I find photos more useful than drawings
It is still difficult to identify trees because there are so many species of some groups.
 
5
   Beautiful field guide!!!
We always hike and wonder what kind of trees we are looking at. This book has beautiful color photos, descriptions and drawings to help you identify trees in our region. It is really helpful to narrow your possibilities in identification based on leaf shape, color, bark color and texture, type of flowers, berries or nuts, etc. Very helpful and informative. As a bonus, the book feels very attractive and is special. It would make a beautiful gift for the nature lover.
 
5
   Better than expected- first class product!
High quality full color photos of leaves, bark and flowers with a very well organized and smart system for figuring out what tree you want to see about that tree. It also helps to tell similar trees apart. Plus, there is a section on how to use the guide that makes it very easy to use. Once you find a tree, you can explore more information about that tree. Everything is indexed and cross referenced so that you can quickly obtain the information you seek. We now have identified many trees with this guide and we think it is the best guide we have seen.
 
4
   Fantastic photography.
This Audubon guide was originally published about 40 years ago. long ago, this house was painted by Donald J. Walsh. It is a field guide for identifying trees in the north-eastern United States. The photographs are excellent and it gives fantastic information about the properties and locations of these trees. Unfortunately, it fails to note whether or not the species are native to North America and whether or not it has become a non-native invasive. Recently published guides now routinely give this information, but I haven t found one that compares to the quality of the photographs in this book. The amateur environmentalist should have everything he needs to ID the trees of the north east, together with more recent guides, and whether or not they are beneficial or harmful to our environment.
 
5
   Great guide for tree identification
Has come in handy several times and has great photos of each tree to make identification easy.
 
5
   My Personal Favorite for Tree ID
I have both eastern and western region books. If it is not in these two books, it is a hybrid or non-native or something really odd. I am a member of an arborist forum and I can ID just about anything anyone throws out there, and am almost always right the first time. It is usually down to some good feature between two closely related species, but this book does a small job delineating between the varieties.
 
3
   OK when there are leaves but not much use in Winter Months.
I like most of the Audubon field guides. This one is however a little disappointing as it fails to help identify deciduous trees in winter when they have no leaves, flowers or fruit. Photographs are excellent, but are all close-ups rather than images of the tree in different seasons of the year.
 
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