Plato: Five Dialogues: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Meno, Phaedo
  • Plato: Five Dialogues: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Meno, Phaedo
  • Plato: Five Dialogues: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Meno, Phaedo
  • Plato: Five Dialogues: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Meno, Phaedo
  • Plato: Five Dialogues: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Meno, Phaedo
  • Plato: Five Dialogues: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Meno, Phaedo
ISBN: 0872206335
EAN13: 9780872206335
Language: English
Pages: 168
Dimensions: 0.47" H x 8.35" L x 5.51" W
Weight: 0.31 lbs.
Format: Paperback
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Book Reviews (6)

5
  |   6  reviews
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5
   Excellent translation in a cheap, convenient set
On my journey through western civilization, I purchased this volume of 5 Dialogues. This title was not on my list, but an impulse buy. I liked the translation of Republic so much that I was happy to recognize the prose of the author. If you want to sample the writings of Plato without committing to a larger work, or if you are on a similar journey, this is a great edition. The writing of Plato is enriched by the work. The dialogues tell the story of the trial and the final day and death of Socrates. The final piece begins with one dialogue before the trial. The nature of the dialogues makes them very easy to understand, especially with repetition of the main points and conclusions.
 
3
   Translation is great, but punctuation hasn’t been updated in a while
It can be hard to understand this translation if you don't master the run on sentence. The translation favors a combination of clauses which are not separated by periods or semi colons. This makes following trains of thought more difficult.
 
5
   Immortal questions. Take them one at a time!
" Do not be overwhelmed by the many questions that are under inquiry in this little gem of a book," said Wittgenstein. Take them one at a time. About 2500 years ago, these words were written. You will be familiar with the thoughts and feelings of the people around you. How do you think so? The acceptance of slavery seems to be a big difference. 2500 years from now, our future selves may be shocked that we are accepting hunger, homelessness, capital punishment, states in trade wars, war on terror and war on drugs, correctional facilities where the focus is on keeping our fellow humans locked up, not their rehabilitation. The spark that shines in Socrates hasn't been lost. Let's keep going.
 
5
   Great!
It's easy to read and make you contemplate life. It almost made me want to live the life of a philosopher and not engage in body's desires because the soul is stronger. It's very convincing, but probably not going to happen. If I could have dinner with anyone who is dead or alive, it would be him.
 
5
   Fascinating and Educational.
It was bought for an ethics course. It's pretty interesting if you understand what's going on. It's a great book to have in your collection. Pages are thin, but they won't rip. It's not the easiest of reads due to the size of the text. It is not bad.
 
5
   Beware of the Kindle version
I'm giving these translations 5 stars. They are the translations I learned. A few years ago, I bought a paperback copy. I decided to buy a copy of the book for convenience. The explanatory notes in the paperback version of the Meno were not included in the kindle version. Bad! The notes were included in the case of the Euthyphro, so perhaps it was carelessness rather than a deliberate policy in the Meno.
 
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