Preserving Food Without Freezing Or Canning: Traditional Techniques Using Salt, Oil, Sugar, Alcohol, Vinegar, Drying, Cold Storage, And Lactic Ferment
  • Preserving Food Without Freezing Or Canning: Traditional Techniques Using Salt, Oil, Sugar, Alcohol, Vinegar, Drying, Cold Storage, And Lactic Ferment
  • Preserving Food Without Freezing Or Canning: Traditional Techniques Using Salt, Oil, Sugar, Alcohol, Vinegar, Drying, Cold Storage, And Lactic Ferment
  • Preserving Food Without Freezing Or Canning: Traditional Techniques Using Salt, Oil, Sugar, Alcohol, Vinegar, Drying, Cold Storage, And Lactic Ferment
ISBN: 1933392592
EAN13: 9781933392592
Language: English
Release Date: Apr 4, 2007
Pages: 224
Dimensions: 0.6" H x 8.9" L x 6" W
Weight: 0.75 lbs.
Format: Paperback

Preserving Food Without Freezing Or Canning: Traditional Techniques Using Salt, Oil, Sugar, Alcohol, Vinegar, Drying, Cold Storage, And Lactic Ferment

by
$19.78
List Price: $25
Save: $5.22 (20%)
Select Format
Select Format Format: Paperback Select Conditions Condition: Very Good

Selected

Format: Paperback

Condition: Very Good

$19.78
List Price: $25
Save: $5.22 (20%)
Quantity
Almost Gone!
Only 1 at this price.

Select Conditions
  • Good $19.78 Preserving Food Without Freezing Or Canning: Traditional Techniques Using Salt, Oil, Sugar, Alcohol, Vinegar, Drying, Cold Storage, And Lactic Ferment
  • Very Good $19.78 Preserving Food Without Freezing Or Canning: Traditional Techniques Using Salt, Oil, Sugar, Alcohol, Vinegar, Drying, Cold Storage, And Lactic Ferment
  • New $25.00 Preserving Food Without Freezing Or Canning: Traditional Techniques Using Salt, Oil, Sugar, Alcohol, Vinegar, Drying, Cold Storage, And Lactic Ferment
Book Overview

Typical books about preserving garden produce nearly always assume that modern kitchen gardeners will boil or freeze their vegetables and fruits. Yet here is a book that goes back to the future--celebrating traditional but little-known French techniques for storing and preserving edibles in ways that maximize flavor and nutrition.

Translated into English, and with a new foreword by Deborah Madison, this book deliberately ignores freezing and high-temperature canning in favor of methods that are superior because they are less costly and more energy-efficient.

As Eliot Coleman says in his foreword to the first edition, Food preservation techniques can be divided into two categories: the modern scientific methods that remove the life from food, and the natural 'poetic' methods that maintain or enhance the life in food. The poetic techniques produce. foods that have been celebrated for centuries and are considered gourmet delights today.

Preserving Food Without Freezing or Canning offers more than 250 easy and enjoyable recipes featuring locally grown and minimally refined ingredients. It is an essential guide for those who seek healthy food for a healthy world.

Frequently Asked Questions About Preserving Food Without Freezing Or Canning: Traditional Techniques Using Salt, Oil, Sugar, Alcohol, Vinegar, Drying, Cold Storage, And Lactic Ferment

Book Reviews (10)

4
  |   10  reviews
Did you read Preserving Food Without Freezing Or Canning: Traditional Techniques Using Salt, Oil, Sugar, Alcohol, Vinegar, Drying, Cold Storage, And Lactic Ferment? Please provide your feedback and rating to help other readers.
Write Review
Captcha
3
   Good book but Not for everyone
I've read the book, and I'm not averse to criticism. There are some good recipes, but mostly the vegetables and dishes are from a very French perspective. Living in the South I don't need a great deal of information on artichokes, chicory, endive, cardoons, and so on. Overall, I enjoyed the book and reading, and it will be useful to others. It will not be my first go to book a preservationist. She uses canning techniques that are not pressurized, and she has no plans to change them. There are recipes for jams, preserves, pickles and the like that are now canned. I did use Apple's own software, Apple with Raisin Jam, for a while. It's just that I had never thought of adding a vanilla bean to the pot, Mr. Rule told us. As I said, a good book but not a first go at storing up or stocking the pantries, I would say a second go to and well worth having. Before you can get started, however, you must have some experience.
 
5
   It makes a very nice addition to my library
Thanks for the introduction, Janet. I plan to try them all, Mr. Dhaliwal said. However, I have been through the UC Master Food Preserver training courses and I would suggest that anyone thinking of using the recipes in this book contact their local Cooperative Extension office to ask for information about how to guarantee the safety of the food they are preserving.
 
3
   Good for beginner preppers
Basic stuff, I had hoped for more meat preserving techniques. Good for anyone who has no experience preserving the harvest.
 
4
   THE OLD WAYS HAVE SOME VALID POINTS
The rising costs of food and it's transportation by truck is forcing us to grow more veggies, and we have no rail system to back up food truck devries, he said. But this book has great ideas of the past for safe canning, preserving and pickling, too.
 
5
   No issues
Great money, Tunick said. I bought this for when I felt like it would serve me well for that purpose and at a reasonable price, Raymond said.
 
4
   it gives you recipies
i like how it gives you recipes, and how to do them, i like how it mentions a 40' pole for one of them.
 
1
   Huge Waste of Money
Turner wasted no time in dismissing the offer, calling it "huge waste of money." They cover a lot of ground, including canning, freezing, drying, pickling, and curing. Penn State, University of Georgia, University of Virginia, and the University of Minnesota are among the schools offering free copies of the book. The information is accurate and free.
 
5
   Like "Bees with a Smile" (bk.), Have a Dry Sense of Humor!
The volume of data being collected by the WHO is going to be increasingly important as world conditions deteriorate. Dry all leafy items, such as kales, chards, spinach and quarters, using a fine mesh strainer. Simply crush the powder, then dip it in a blender or food processor until it's ready to eat. Store them in resealable plastic bags in popcorn tins or other resealable containers. Simply add 2 tablespoons of the desired amount of fat to your favorite smoothie, soup, stew or meat sauce, and you're good to go. It's just that they don't have enough money." McCartney said: "If anything, this will be a good thing." It's just that you never know when your tin will run out." It's great to have that extra space to grow your flavor and nutrition.
 
5
   Easy and interesting to read
I've read all the books, and I love this one. It is easy to read and the methods within its pages are great, Raymond said. We have had so many power outages due to wildfires, that being able to preserve at least some small amount of food without electricity is handy, Mr. Dhaliwal said.
 
5
   To the point
love this book to the point and has good suggestions as well as tells history how it was done, no guessing, no headaches trying to find what to do with extra veggies. Also, if you loose your fridge and freezer, you probably don't have electricity to read an ebook.
 
1