Puerto Rican Cookery
  • Puerto Rican Cookery
  • Puerto Rican Cookery
  • Puerto Rican Cookery
ISBN: 0882894110
EAN13: 9780882894119
Language: English
Release Date: Mar 31, 1983
Pages: 408
Dimensions: 1.4" H x 8.8" L x 6.3" W
Weight: 1.45 lbs.
Format: Hardcover
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Format: Hardcover

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Book Overview

Takes the reader on an interesting culinary journey. -Key West Citizen

The foremost authority on Puerto Rican cooking is a silver haired, stylish, and warmly hospitable woman named Carmen Aboy Valldejuli . . . her books] are considered today to be the definitive books on island cooking.
-New York Times

Its recipes are authentic, well tested, and exactly written. -Cecily Brownstone, food editor, Associated Press

Puerto Rican Cookery, now in its twenty-third printing with 130,000 in print, has become the standard reference on traditional native cookery (cocina criolla). According to the San Juan Star, the cookbook is seen and is more likely better read in some homes than the religious tome. . . . it] is considered a primer for beginning cooks . . . a textbook for home economists and it is a guide for the gourmet as well.

The recipes in this book are as bewitching as an off-shore breeze, plumbing the mysteries of native dishes in accurate and easy-to-follow details that assure the success of every recipe-whether it is for Pickled Chicken or Sweet Potato Pudding. In Puerto Rican Cookery, the late Carmen Aboy Valldejuli traces the development of traditional native cookery and reveals secrets of the essence of Puerto Rican cookery-keymark to fabulous island delicacies. Native Taino petroglyphs illustrate this handsome book.

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Book Reviews (8)

4
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5
   Truly the best cook book for authentic puerto rican cookery that you will ever find or need
It's great to have found this book, Claudia said. I lost my first one, too, when I moved to New York City from Puerto Rico. Authentic recipes that will bring loads of compliments from family and guests, Mrs. Caramore said. I am not Puerto Rican but lived in PR for 10 years and used this book daily. In the days leading up to Christmas, all barrio, Pinas Arriba, looked forward to my Coquito, Pastelles, flan de queso and Eclairs. Of course, I never let go of where my wonderful cooking skills came from. I highly recommend this book to anyone who wants to make authentic Puerto Rican food that is sure to impress even the best of Puerto Rican cooks!
 
5
   ... my mother owning this book and it's just really great to have my own and to have it in ...
It's just really great to have my own and to have it in my home, Cohen said.
 
2
   Big disappointment
I am fully Puerto Rican on both sides. I have never put Ham in my sofrito, cooked it and then frozen it, Mr. Dhaliwal said. Bought this book because of the reviews and the fact that I am a culinary training specialist, and wanted to get the so-called holy grail pr cook book. It must have been a missed few things, Mr. Rule told the judge. Added are some things that don't make sense. Like the random raisins and milk in the pasteles, we're all for it. Milk is the only food that doesn't taste like raisins. There's a codfish dish I've never heard of that adds raisins as well. They call it "salted codfish and raisins." Yes, I do believe in reincarnation, Mr. Dhaliwal said. I was very disappointed with this one, said Dr. Julie Gerberding of the Children's Hospital at Montefiore. I was so excited to be working with him, but it missed the mark in many ways. This is not a real representation of normal Puerto Rican food and culture. The cover shows normal farm ppl and the cuisine and the art work is taino inspired. But the recipes are Puerto Rican inspired, so I'm calling it quits.
 
1
   A disappointment
There are just a handful of traditional Puerto Rican recipes left. However, this book is not a complete story of Puerto Rican food. In her book, "The Fifth Estate," Elizabeth Warren tells the story of a wealthy widow with a wealthy husband who liked to entertain in the mid-20th century. Some of the recipes are traditional but most are heavily influenced by the American cuisine of the time. It has nothing to do with the traditional foods that were handed down for generations from the indigenous, the African slaves and Spaniards, he said. Brand new York is a French city without a subway.
 
5
   I'm in love.
All the women in my family kept their recipes to themselves because it was a secret and they were old fashion, she said. They would not let me cook. And finally found their secret in English. As a divorced dad of two now I can cook the meals I grow up on and make them a little healthier for me and my kids.
 
5
   Oldie but Goodie.....
I bought this book as a present, have owned it for over twenty years. It is the cookbook that you often see all over in Puerto Rico, it comes in both English and Spanish. It's the standard cookbook from yesteryear. There are many more puerto rican cookbooks out there, but this is one of the first cookbooks to highlight Puerto Rican cuisine on a global scale. Authentic Mexican food is a must-have. Highly recommend. It's great to be back home, said Blair.
 
5
   My Grandmother gave me this book in Spanish
It's great to have the book in English and Digital, even if the one my grandmother gave me was in Spanish. The food is great. It's great to be back home, said Hiram Monzon, executive director of the Puerto Rican Food Bank.
 
3
   Great recipes, but I wish the recipe names were ...
Great recipes, but I wish the recipe names had been in Spanish or English so that it would have been easier to find recipes.
 
1