Reading While Black: African American Biblical Interpretation as an Exercise in Hope
  • Reading While Black: African American Biblical Interpretation as an Exercise in Hope
  • Reading While Black: African American Biblical Interpretation as an Exercise in Hope
ISBN: 083085486X
EAN13: 9780830854868
Language: English
Release Date: Sep 1, 2020
Pages: 200
Dimensions: 1" H x 9" L x 6" W
Weight: 0.75 lbs.
Format: Paperback
Publisher:

Reading While Black: African American Biblical Interpretation as an Exercise in Hope

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Book Overview

  • 2021 Christian Book Award(R) program - Faith and Culture
  • 2020 Foreword INDIES Book of the Year Finalist - Religion
  • 2021 Outreach Resources of the Year - Christian Living
  • 2021 Christianity Today Book Award - Beautiful Orthodoxy
  • 2020 The Gospel Coalition Book Award - Popular Theology - Honorable Mention
  • 2020 Emerging Public Intellectual Award

Growing up in the American South, Esau McCaulley knew firsthand the ongoing struggle between despair and hope that marks the lives of some in the African American context. A key element in the fight for hope, he discovered, has long been the practice of Bible reading and interpretation that comes out of traditional Black churches. This ecclesial tradition is often disregarded or viewed with suspicion by much of the wider church and academy, but it has something vital to say. Reading While Black is a personal and scholarly testament to the power and hope of Black biblical interpretation. At a time in which some within the African American community are questioning the place of the Christian faith in the struggle for justice, New Testament scholar McCaulley argues that reading Scripture from the perspective of Black church tradition is invaluable for connecting with a rich faith history and Read More chevron_right

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Book Reviews (14)

5
  |   14  reviews
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1
   Racial Divisiveness
You can't stay far away from explosives.
 
5
   Great book!
A great book, Gillian. Cultural barriers are good but gaining a better understanding of one another is great.
 
5
   Insightful read
The book will change the way I read the bible. Overall, it was a good performance, Bruno said.
 
5
   Outstanding
Really good book. I hope this book becomes the centerpiece of Christian conversation on racial issues, he said. It's great to be back home, said Blair.
 
5
   Great book!
Best book of the year by far. He added that the Rev. Evans "truly a gift for the church and a godsend for people of color."
 
5
   Good book
It was an Amazon recommendation. I am quite glad I made the purchase, said Dr. Chester Floyd, director of NASA's Ames Research Center in California. The author combines biblical analysis with personal stories and background. The awards that this book has received are well-deserved.
 
5
   Excellent
Thanks again, Dr. McCaulley, for this thoughtful and well-researched discussion of how Black theologies and experiences illuminate Scripture for all its hearers.
 
5
   Very insightful read
He has a very good story to tell, said McCaulley. His chapter on Black rage is exceptional, I will never read Psalm 137 the same again.
 
5
   Perfect book for 2020
However, this book is not recommended for Christians trying to reconcile their religious calling and political beliefs.
 
5
   A must-read for our time!
I was first captivated by a talk Dr. McCaulley gave at a conference that challenged me as a white Christian to refine my understanding of liberation theology and to see it from a different angle. His book expanded on some of those themes and offered so much more. He manages to balance the personal with the academic in a way that can engage a wide swath of parishioners, lay leaders, clergy, and theologians. Significantly, he validates the deep anger--even rage--that victims of injustice can experience while leading his readers into a true encounter with the hope offered in Christ.
 
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