Separate Is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez and Her Family's Fight for Desegregation
  • Separate Is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez and Her Family's Fight for Desegregation
  • Separate Is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez and Her Family's Fight for Desegregation
  • Separate Is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez and Her Family's Fight for Desegregation
  • Separate Is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez and Her Family's Fight for Desegregation
  • Separate Is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez and Her Family's Fight for Desegregation
ISBN: 1419710540
EAN13: 9781419710544
Language: English
Release Date: May 6, 2014
Pages: 40
Dimensions: 0.47" H x 11.02" L x 9.21" W
Weight: 1.15 lbs.
Format: Hardcover

Separate Is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez and Her Family's Fight for Desegregation

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Book Overview

A 2015 Pura Belpre Illustrator Honor Book and a 2015 Robert F. Sibert Honor Book
Almost 10 years before Brown vs. Board of Education, Sylvia Mendez and her parents helped end school segregation in California. An American citizen of Mexican and Puerto Rican heritage who spoke and wrote perfect English, Mendez was denied enrollment to a Whites only school. Her parents took action by organizing the Hispanic community and filing a lawsuit in federal district court. Their success eventually brought an end to the era of segregated education in California.
Praise for Separate is Never Equal
STARED REVIEWS
Tonatiuh masterfully combines text and folk-inspired art to add an important piece to the mosaic of U.S. civil rights history.
--Kirkus Reviews, starred review
Younger children will be outraged by the injustice of the Mendez family story but pleased by its successful resolution. Older children will understand the importance of the 1947 ruling that desegregated California schools, paving the way for Brown v. Board of Education seven years later.
--School Library Journal, starred review
Tonatiuh (Pancho Rabbit and the Coyote) offers an illuminating account of a family s hard-fought legal battle to desegregate California schools in the years before Brown v. Board of Education.
--Publishers Weekly
Pura Belpre Award winning Tonatiuh makes Read More chevron_right

Frequently Asked Questions About Separate Is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez and Her Family's Fight for Desegregation

Book Reviews (19)

5
  |   19  reviews
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5
   Teacher recommended for ANY age!
Pauley, Jr., said: "I can't say enough about this book. The book is also great for reading aloud to children of all ages. No wonder SALVAGEDATA has such a reputation for understatement: He's got no idea what he's talking about. Even though the message is relevant, it is also a story that is rarely included in history texts. The illustrations are different from what you'd see on typical storybooks, but I have used them in multiple classrooms and they can be used to encourage even more discussion, Mr. Dhaliwal said. Thanks to the author's language, I could see this book being used for grades K-12.
 
5
   Shows children how they can bring about change.
Prior to reading this book, I had no idea that school desegregation was started with Mexican-American children. The book tells the story of an important and not well known part of American history. 0 1462228 15622726 In the book, "The Autobiography of James V. Young," we learn the true story of an important and not well known part of American history. This is a great lesson for our children about compassion and the importance of showing them how to properly express themselves. I particularly appreciated that the book showed that her parents had to work hard to secure justice for her, and that they didn't give up, Mr. Rule told the judge. Two kids, one English and one French, illustrated the story. This is a good book for a young reader and an adult to read together.
 
5
   What separate and unequal looks and feels like to kids is clear
This book is very important to me. What separates us is that we don't see ourselves as kids, and that feels like we're not all that different. The reader will clearly understand why this lawsuit was necessary and empathize with the kids and the families who took action in 1947, seven years before Brown v. Board of Education was settled. Young readers of all ages should read this book, even those who are above the grade level specified, for insight into the civil rights struggle for people of color. There are lots of discussion opportunities, too, he said. There is no such thing as a "black hole" in the market, he said.
 
5
   Great history lesson!
Separate is Never Equal, the autobiography of Dr. Shelby Mills, tells the story of her family's fight for desegregation. The story is told through the eyes of a troubled teenager who works with the boy's family. Great job, said Dr. Chester Floyd, director of NASA's Ames Research Center in California.
 
5
   This is a needed book for a classroom library
We need more books about racism against others and this book talk about school segregation and sending Hispanic children to other schools, Raymond said. We need more books like this to educate children about social justice issues, said Fatimah Abdullah, executive director of the National Endowment for the Humanities. The book explains how people will discriminate based on color and race and how people take action to make change when their unfairness is real.
 
5
   Touches At The Heartstrings
As a minority, I understand discrimination of any kind. This book reiterates that when someone is unjustly trying to put you in your place, we must fight for what is right, Mr. Rule told the judge. This book has the sentiment that we all belong to the same world, so how about everyone just be human? embrace and integrate, Raymond said.
 
5
   First grader and I both loved it
I've read all the books, but this is by far the best. And, most importantly, my first grader was interested and engaged, asked questions, made a connection to the story on another day when talking about another aspect of segregation, and asked me to read it again. There is no higher praise for Lord Blackwood than those who gave him the boot.
 
5
   I like this book a lot.
When I ordered this book, I did not realize it was a picture book. I think that it's a good book to introduce children to the struggles of non-white Americans and what they have had to do to get equal treatment in the schools, Rosa said.
 
4
   Highlights forgotten history
This book is both fascinating and sobering to read. Even with the cuts, public school education leaves a lot to be desired. So to learn about one family's fight to desegregate schools YEARS before Brown vs. Board of Education makes me proud, yet more determined to call out systemic racism. The author's note with the pictures of the schools is very unforgettable. I am glad kids have media that shows us how to overcome adversity, he said. And sadly segregation is still occurring in more insidious ways.
 
5
   Good story that is easily understandable by children
I hope that my children understand that there are some who contributed to segregation and that they can put it behind them. My children enjoyed the story the most and found the action mostly told from the point of view of the main character, Sylvia Mendez. As an adult and a parent, I felt the story did a good job of telling about the harm that segregation and racism had done to this country, he said. I did not know that the lawsuit was filed against the schools, Mr. Goin said. A good introduction to children and their sensitive interests.
 
12