The Turning Point: 1851--A Year That Changed Charles Dickens And The World
ISBN: 0525655948
EAN13: 9780525655947
Language: English
Release Date: Mar 1, 2022
Pages: 368
Dimensions: 1" H x 9" L x 6" W
Weight: 2 lbs.
Format: Hardcover
Select Format Format: Hardcover Select Conditions Condition: New

Selected

Format: Hardcover

Condition: New

$30.00
Quantity
Almost Gone!
Only 3 at this price.

Select Conditions
  • New $30.00 The Turning Point: 1851--A Year That Changed Charles Dickens And The World

Frequently Asked Questions About The Turning Point: 1851--A Year That Changed Charles Dickens And The World

Book Reviews (3)

2
  |   3  reviews
Did you read The Turning Point: 1851--A Year That Changed Charles Dickens And The World? Please provide your feedback and rating to help other readers.
Write Review
Captcha
1
   A barely-readable hodge-podge of unassimilated miscellania
My history was my main, and I have a long book collection on the Industrial Revolution, the Great Exhibit of 1851 and am familiar with Dickens. I don 't know where this book wanted to go with it, and the confused prologue was not much of a guide. If you must wait two months and get it off the rest of the pile.
 
3
   A Turn of the Page
If you admire Charles Dickens and have read his novel Bleak House, this will be a book to buy and enjoy. For the rest of us, however, this is a trifle too much like a university class presented by a literary teacher who knows his subject backwards and forwards and is surprised at the end of the class that you are not as interested in the topic as he. While this detailed examination of a year in the great writer's life contains many items of interest, I think that Professor Fairhurst's subtitle A year that changed Charles Dickens and the World is wildly overstated.
 
2
   read Dickens instead
After reading the first 100 pages or so, it was all I could do to keep turning the pages, and I hadn 't seen anything that I didn't already know. I read all Dickens'novels except HARD TIMES, and I am usually a major fan of lit crit, history and biographies, but this set a constant refrain in my mind of just get on with it! It certainly did not make me want to reread or rethink the novels. To me, this is a major problem. The title and especially the subtitle are not supported by the rest of the book, and the author could pick up some pointsers about how to tell a story from Dickens himself. Instead of this meandering treatment, read or reread BLEAK HOUSE and OUR MUTUAL FRIEND.
 
1