The White Tiger
  • The White Tiger
  • The White Tiger
  • The White Tiger
  • The White Tiger
ISBN: 1416562605
EAN13: 9781416562603
Language: English
Release Date: Oct 14, 2008
Pages: 304
Dimensions: 0.9" H x 8.4" L x 5.5" W
Weight: 0.65 lbs.
Format: Paperback
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Book Overview

This Description may be from another edition of this product.

With her patented page-singeing sensuality (Booklist), New York Times bestselling author Jennifer Ashley returns to the primal and passionate world of her Shifters Unbound series as a woman is lured into the shadows of a dangerous manhunt.

For twenty years, Kendrick, a white tiger Shifter, has been the Guardian of un-Collared Shifters who spend their lives living in secret--and in fear of being shunted into Shiftertowns. When Kendrick's group is discovered and forced to flee, Kendrick is more desperate than ever to protect them

In a diner in the middle of nowhere, lonely waitress Addison Price has seen a lot of unusual drifters come and go, but none has ever captivated--and intimidated--her like the imposing fugitive who wields a broadsword with incredible skill. But when he risks all to protect her, Addison's fear turns to empathy--and empathy to desire as she learns more about her savior. Soon she's more than willing to help the crushingly sensual white tiger and his cubs in a passionate bid for freedom. Whatever the cost.

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Book Reviews (14)

5
  |   14  reviews
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5
   So interesting
The book was recommended to me by a friend who spent a few weeks in India as a representative of real India, but a little exaggerated. It was eye-opening to learn about the country. The writing was lively and humorous in a way that it catches you off guard. She loved it.
 
4
   Thought-provoking
The story takes place in contemporary India and sheds some light on the social-economic situation there. I read several reviews by Indians who said that this is an accurate portrayal. I read this for a women's book club -- a church book club, so I want to let people know that there is quite a bit of profanity in the book.
 
4
   Great contemporary fiction
Angew, Poverty, Inequity, Labor Exploitation, and Corruption lie at the heart of Aravind Adiga's debut novel, The White Tiger. A man living in Central India, calls it The Dark Knight writes a letter to the Premier of China, in which he tells him the story of how he got there through luck, ambiguous morals and murder. It is an engaging story, filled with social, political, and economic remarks on hillarious issues of modern India. But more importantly, the novel is a cry of anger, an exposure of the contrasts of a nation that struggles against capitalism in a world of markets and capital, amid growing poverty and inequality.
 
4
   Quick, entertaining read
I enjoyed this book ''. It is a quick, entertaining read and an interesting story that is metaphorical for modern India, I think. I see why it is the type of edgy, provocative, original book that wins awards. It isn 't the kind of book I love. I do, however, think it is an interesting point of view and is worth a read.
 
5
   Wonderful in every way
How did I not catch this first when it came out? In every respect, wonderful. Even if you are not interested in contemporary India, it is worth reading. An eye-opener into l a country trying to reconcile its growing assimilation of 21st century life with a history and culture that sometimes makes for awkward results.
 
5
   Entertainingly written with a great deal of insight into India's issues of wealth and ...
Entertainingly written with a great deal of insight into the issues of wealth and poverty in India, democracy and corruption. However, this is not a happy ending, feel-good book with a shining protagonist. Moral failings abound in pretty much all characters. My book club found it a wonderful book to discuss. One comment in particular was that India made victims of everyone in this book.
 
4
   A booker prize winning book, exposes the darker side ...
A booker - winning book exposes the darker side of Indian life in a fictional novel. The tragedies of human existence of the poverty-stricken are exposed. The killing, which comes later in the book is macabre to me and I was wondering if it could have been different. It is overall revealing about human frailties.
 
5
   India from the bottom up
So dramatic and dramatic. A very long definition of entrepreneurship, but worth the plot.
 
4
   The White Tiger (My Kindle Review)
This is an interesting Rachman-to-riches story that starts slows, but then gets right to its story destination. Balram comes from a rural Indian village and has a good childhood. He tells his story in letters : a driver for a wealthy couple. But his perfect job could be in danger when an unexpected evening run hits and how he could end up the scapegoat. The driving force behind this novel is Balram's narrative and journey into a successful life. It took a while for me to get into the story, but once it did, it is an interesting ride that takes a witty and charming detour in it's second half. This tiger may look imperious, but is still a feisty animal. A-Majority D-Doctor Withdrawn
 
4
   satirical picture of non-bollywood india
The satirical creation of Balram Halwai, New Delhi Chauffeur Aravind Adiga is the villain of his own autobiography. Balram tells his amoral, humorous rags-riches story without apology or regret, justifying his ascent by detailing the unfairness of life in sprayed-over-crowded modern India for undercastes like himself. Fantasies like Bollywood - films and real apologetics like A Passage to India '' are greatly refuted by Adiga's close look at the colonial lives of the masses of India.
 
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