Ways and Means: Lincoln and His Cabinet and the Financing of the Civil War
ISBN: 0735223556
EAN13: 9780735223554
Language: English
Release Date: Mar 8, 2022
Pages: 432
Weight: 1 lbs.
Format: Hardcover
Publisher:

Ways and Means: Lincoln and His Cabinet and the Financing of the Civil War

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Book Reviews (6)

5
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5
   Outstanding work on how the civil war was really won
The work is researched and writing is great.
 
4
   The establishment of paper as legal tender supported by the Federal Government won the war.
The federal government backed the establishment of paper currency into legal tender. The concept of a united currency supported by an industrial network throughout the North had to contend with a lot of different things. A national legal tender may not have happened for several more decades without the catalyst of civil war. The resilience of the Confederate infantry as it fought so long and hard to support the slave-holding oligarchy remains a mystery. The author's mistakes re the military side of the Civil War are the only quibble. E.g. At Second Bull Run, Robert E. Lee commanded Confederate forces. The Battle ofChickamauga was in Georgia. Financial discussions were enlightening.
 
4
   NOT just about Lincoln's Cabinet
It was a better read than I anticipated. Lincoln was thinking of retiring to California. The book goes beyond Lincoln's cabinet. He is a bit weak on the military side of the Civil War, but he uses a lot of sources. The value of understanding how economically strong the North was is that there was a lot of non-war stuff going on.
 
5
   Paper Bullets
The U.S. Civil War was more than just a war. The reader is provided with an economic side of the contest. Finance was handled by both sides in the war. What happened to paper greenbacks? Why did the South think cotton could solve all their problems? The economic system in the north was superior. A strong federal government, scores of land-grant colleges, and a transcontinental railroad are all legacies of the Civil War. The author's story is put to the side in most Civil War histories. Some of our social problems are explained in a story which also explains the strength of the United States.
 
5
   An eye-popping books about Civil War political and economic realtiess
This is a great book for Civil War era readers. The north took Hamilton's path to success while the south took Jefferson's path to ruin. The author's financial aspects are well-explained and not too deep for non-economists. The Civil War period is covered in the story as told, especially its political and cultural legacy. This is a great read to me. I found two small edits and wish the asterisks were larger, but neither comment detracts from the work by Roger Lowenstein. The Epilogue shows how much more the federal government could have done for the American people if Lincoln had completed his second term.
 
5
   No bucks, no Buck Rogers
In The Right Stuff, the astronauts realize the need for cash was more important than anything in winning the Civil War, and in the same year, Lincoln and his treasury secretary took office with a completely empty treasury. The groundwork for governmental capitalism was laid in the Civil War by one side. High flying finance was one of Lincoln's many talents. The key to success for political candidates is raising money. Even before the invention of the phone, Lincoln was doing this.
 
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